“Accident” over to tell them this.” After admitting his

 “Accident” is a short story written
by Dave Eggers describing the scene of a car accident between the narrator of
the story and three teenagers. The story is told from the 2nd person point of
view as the word “you” is used often, for example, “You have done him
and his friends harm, in a way, and you jeopardized their health, and now you
are so close you feel like you share a heart.” By using the word
“you” Egger allows the reader to step into the shoes of the narrator
and give them the opportunity to get a feel of how it is to get into a car
accident and judge the situation from the perspective of the person who caused
the accident.

The
narrator’s attitude towards the accident shift from the beginning of the story
to the end. The narrator’s initial response was, “The accident was your
fault, and you walk over to tell them this.” After admitting his faults,
the story circles around the fear of approaching the teenagers and how they
would react. In his mind, he thought the complete worse about the situation by
saying, “They have every right to be upset, or livid, or even
violence-contemplating”. His overthinking led him to believe that the
teenagers were going to harm him in some way for causing the accident,
therefore, before approaching the teenagers the narrator began to talk down on
himself by saying “You are a bad person, you think.”, to justify the
teenagers’ actions if they were to harm them.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Throughout
a majority of the story, the narrator’s thoughts and action can be viewed as
relatable because he feels what most people would feel when in a situation such
as a car accident. Like any other person who gets into an accident he thinks the
worse because car accidents bring out the worse in people. Unlike others, he
admitted to being wrong meaning he did it on purpose and was fully aware of
what he was doing. The statement, “You pulled into an intersection,
obstructing them, and their car hit yours,” shows that it was in fact no
accident.

After
approaching the teenagers, the interaction did not go as expected. The driver,
although he bought the car that same day, was very understanding and did not
cause a scene. As the conversation continued the narrator and the three
teenagers grew friendly and the narrator was ever so thankful that some good
came out of the situation.

 Based on the short story, it is evident that
the narrator lives alone, and doesn’t have any family or friends, as the
narrator stated, “You all get out of your cars. You are alone in
yours…”. The narrator is so lonely to the point that he’ll go to the
measure of causing a car accident just to have some form of human contact, but
when he does have some form of human contact he’s thankful whether good or bad.

The
final paragraphs of the story show that the narrator is longing for human contact,
the statement “…you are so lonely, so lonely always, and all contact is
contact, and all contact makes us so grateful we want to cry and dance and cry
and cry”, proves this point. The reader can assume that he feels close to these
boys after just a small display of kindness because he’s lacking these things
in his everyday life. Clearly, the narrator is grateful for the encounter with
the teenagers because in a matter of a few minutes they showed him attention
and understanding which he does not receive on a daily.

In
addition, the narrator overthinks everything and does not try to find the
brighter side of the situation. He automatically assumes the worse because
that’s what he’s used to, things not going well or as planned. The narrator was
expected to get physically or verbally harmed for his decision but in the end,
the altercation took a turn for the better. The interaction opened his eyes and
made him realized that good can come out of a bad situation. “In a moment of
clarity, you finally understand why boxers, who want so badly to hurt each
other, can rest their heads on the shoulders of their opponents.”